College Athletes Should Not Get Paid

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Many People argue over the hot topic that still gets discussed today: whether or not that college athletes should get paid for playing their respective sports. The answer  is that they shouldn’t. Paying these young athletes can cause many distractions throughout their years at college.

College is about preparing oneself for real life. It is supposed to provide tools and abilities to succeed after college. In that manner, college athletes are no different than other college students, who practice in hospitals, law firms or advertising agencies. They all work hard for little to no money, so why should athletes be any different?

A lot of young adults today are impatient and lack the ability to delay gratification. College can teach them a great life lesson: iIn real life, you have to work hard and wait for your chance. Paying big money to any college student, athlete or academic, is far from being the ideal preparation for life.

People argue that paying college athletes will help create a sense of financial awareness for them. However, in reality, poor investments, trusting unethical financial advisors, and lavish spending habits are some of the main reasons professional athletes find themselves broke after they retire. Without sound financial education, young college athletes may not be equipped to handle so much money.

If salaries will replace scholarships in college sports, athletes won’t earn much more. In fact, an impressive $100,000-a-year salary for a college athlete will grant him only a few hundred dollars more per year than a scholarship. According to Time.com, a full athletic scholarship at an NCAA Division I university is about $65,000 a year. This includes tuition, room, board, and books (if you enroll at a college with high tuition). In contrast, a salary will be subjected to federal and state income taxes. Therefore, out of the $100,000, a net of $65,100 will remain for the student. The difference is very significant.

On the other hand, many discuss the benefits of how college athletes getting paid, and explain how it is right and good for athletes to get paid for what they do because they deserve it.  They sacrifice a lot of hard work and dedication for what the do. So in order reward and acknowledge them, they should get paid a decent amount of money.

An important argument coming from those who oppose paying college athletes is the expected difficulty involved with implementing such a far-reaching move. The following are just some of the questions that pinpoint the complexities: Who will pay for students (the NCAA or colleges)? How often will they receive pay? Will there be a salary cap? The main question regards the equitable application of paying college athletes, namely who will get paid and who won’t.

One of the best aspects of college sports is the players’ enthusiasm. Their love and passion for their respective game are admirable and respectable. Paying them takes this fundamental aspect of college sports away.

In conclusion, College Athletes should not get paid!